“Not P-Rose”

20120712-102946.jpg

Not P-rose

Perhaps a rose by any other name
would smell as sweet, but the unappellated
bud, the un-monickered bloom whose fame
has not been sung (its petals not related
in pinked syllables, scent characterized
by a synesthesia of waltz and skirt,
mud taste of coffee beans and honeyed pies),
that flower–that not-called-rose–will not insert
itself in my memory, which even smells
with words (as much as nose), holding most close
those lines that ring, that linger, echoed bells,
clinging even to harsh jangles more than prose
(some prose).  A rose–let it take new names in turn
but let them, my brain whispers, be names I learn.

*************************************************

The above is a sonnet (of sorts) written for the dVerse Poets Pub “Form For All” challenge, hosted by the extremely thoughtful, generous and lyrical Gay Reiser Cannon, to write a poem on… poetry.   Check out dVerse, which is about to celebrate its first anniversary.

Also if anyone truly has time on their hands, they may enjoy looking at a very early (and quite different) draft of the poem above that I wrote one April, National Poetry Month, a couple of years back, on the 25th day of the month (when I was writing a poem a day).  The precursor really doesn’t work that well, but may be interesting to those intrigued by process.

Finally!  I have a poem featured in a new blog/zine– “Ten of the Best – Short Poetry,” which highlights ten short poems each month.  My poem arose from Brian Miller’s “buttons” prompt  – “Parkinson’s (Father)”.   Thanks  thanks thanks to Kolembo, the editor, and to all of you.

Explore posts in the same categories: elephants, poetry, Uncategorized

Tags: , , , , , ,

You can comment below, or link to this permanent URL from your own site.

35 Comments on ““Not P-Rose””

  1. Mama Zen Says:

    I love the way this moves! Excellent write.

    • ManicDdaily Says:

      Thanks so much, MZ. Reading your comment = as another 55er – I realize I did not even think about numbers of words – but I’ll try something tomorrow I hope. Thanks much. k.


  2. Synesthesia–a favorite word! Especially liked the last line–great form!


  3. Wonderful! I especially loved: (its petals not related
    in pinked syllables, scent characterized
    by a synesthesia of waltz and skirt,
    mud taste of coffee beans and honeyed pies),

  4. brian miller Says:

    moce…congrats on the inclusion in the 10 best…kenny is a great guy….woot on it coming out of the buttons prompt too…

    nice on the sonnet…it is pretty funny that this came out of a write that started as one when you were too tired to write…to me that is a testament to writing anyway…even when we dont feel like it…

    it reads very nice…

  5. Susan Says:

    First the title–“not p-rose” nailed it—ha ha ha!!
    Okay, now I’ll go and read the rest.

    “that flower–that not-called-rose–will not insert
    itself in my memory, which even smells
    with words (as much as nose), holding most close
    those lines that ring, that linger, echoed bells,
    clinging even to harsh jangles more than prose”

    It’s the memory that sniffs, right? Gosh golly I keep finding this amusing, at least tongue in cheek, but very seriously a word IS a prerequisite, I agree.

    A wonderful SONNET! With a great Final Couplet! Thanks.

  6. Claudia Says:

    congrats on the featured poem..great piece for sure..

    this one is very cool with the flow and the word play..P-rose…ha……a synesthesia of waltz and skirt…so good

  7. David King Says:

    Yes, it IS a sonnet, of a sort that is quite beautiful. I concur with its sentiments as well – an all round success.

  8. vivinfrance Says:

    I think you had a lot of fun with this: joyful poeming brings its reward. Your wordplay is sublime.


  9. A rose is still a rose by any other name and, poetry is still poetry… and this is a lovely read.

  10. yoga-adan Says:

    interesting little piece, i like it!

    esp liked these lines,

    “the un-monickered bloom whose fame
    has not been sung (its petals not related
    in pinked syllables”

    i could see those three lines tagged to just the right photo or image, one only you could create and join it to ;-)

    thanks K. ;-)


  11. Congrats on the featured work K ~

    I enjoy your unique voice…not a rose but maybe by another name with not so pink syllables ~

    • ManicDdaily Says:

      Thanks so much. I realize that I was not so clear with the pink = I think it’s also an old (obviously way-out-of-use term) for a carnation (of just about any color). But I don’t think anyone thinks of it that way any more – only perhaps people who are ninety years old in truth or spirit. Agh! k.

  12. janehewey Says:

    I especially love your ending. the middle of your piece, inserted into parentheses is something of a grounding element, i think. the repetitive ng sounds are superb. loved this overall. congratulations on the publishing of Parkinsons. It is really a magnificent piece. One of my faves of yours.


  13. I like this, Karin! I’m going to look at “Colonel” now.
    Congrats on the “Ten of the Best” for “Parkinsons”!


  14. I like this sonnet ‘of sorts’, it is a tricky little poem, clever stuff :)


  15. Love the first line and title, a fantastic poem on poetry… By any other name… Really love it.
    I’m away this wknd, so not much time to visit and read your other poems mentioned. Congrats on the one chosen this month – will read as soon as I can…

    • ManicDdaily Says:

      Thanks so much, Debbie. I have to make some rounds too. I’ve been very busy last night and today. Thanks much for taking the time to visit and thanks for your kind comment. k.

  16. Chazinator Says:

    There’s a lot going on here, which is very cool, especially in the context of synesthesia. I take the title to referencebthe logical operator not p, which suggests the nature of your disagreement with the notion that we might be able to imagine what not p is. Having said that, the intimate relationship between language and love is playfully explored, coming out on the side of only a love that can be said. (What other kind is there, perhaps?) You suggest that not P-rose might be unreal, and that the p-rose refers to the real rose thatbwe sense and experience and remember, though the not p might suggest that it is impossible for anything else but p to be conceived anyway. I love the playfulness of this, especially the way that it has this logical background to it. I’m not sure I agree on logical grounds, but Imreally enjoyed the double meaning that you use to say it! :)

    • ManicDdaily Says:

      Charles, I just meant not prose. I wasn’t so thoughtful, though I do need language to think and remember. I am unfortunately not someone who has any understanding of philosophy–a definite weak point. K.

    • ManicDdaily Says:

      Well I was making a joke on rose and its naming too in the title but I am more simple I’m afraid. K

    • ManicDdaily Says:

      I have a glimmer of what you are saying but it’s a bit blurred but maybe I who am always complaining about punctuation should have punctuated differently as in Not P(rose). K.


  17. This is my favorite part:

    “in pinked syllables, scent characterized
    by a synesthesia of waltz and skirt,
    mud taste of coffee beans and honeyed pies),”

  18. hedgewitch Says:

    I enjoy reading other people’s sonnets, as you know, k, and this one contains all the reasons why–it seems a completely organic growth, like a rosebush, or a not-rose bush, and it makes the mental wheels revolve. I never chose plants with clunky names to put in poems–unless they serve a dramatic purpose–romance and lyricism depend strongly on image and nuance. I love the phrase, ‘smelling with words.”


  19. I really enjoyed that Karin, some great un-common words used and the style was one not often seen.
    Thanks!

  20. lucychili Says:

    i especially like your elephants =)
    they are a different kind of bloom

  21. Gay Says:

    Thank you for your kind words and regrets for not getting here sooner. The asthma attack took a lot out of me and I’m just back to something approximating “normal” today.

    How I loved your sonnet! How wonderfully it rolled around on my tongue and all my senses. So playful, so sensuous, so onomatopoetic! The fun of poetry, the joy of the right words saying the right things, names that fit the object are all embedded here. It’s a joy I will want to visit over and over again.


  22. hahahahaha, there he is again, that little elephant …

    beautiful sonnet


I'd love to hear from you!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,019 other followers